ShowMe: Enriching Global Education with Flipped Learning Technology

This post was originally published by Insights success.

Flipped learning is a blended learning process which makes learning more engaging and fruitful for learners and involves them in the learning process without much effort. This is the most acclaimed and admired process of education today where the classroom activities and homework assignments are reversed or flipped. The new generation has become smart and so has the learning and teaching process. With the flipped etiquettes of technology, the learning methodology has also been flipped to enrich the classroom experience.

ShowMe is a flipped learning technology that turns a touchscreen device into a personal interactive whiteboard allowing teachers to easily record voice-over lessons and share with their private classrooms or a community of teachers and students. Founded in 2009, ShowMe graduated from the DreamIt Ventures accelerator and received an initial funding from reputable VCs such as Lerer Hippeau, SV Angel, Betaworks, Learn Capital, Bold Start, and Eniac. ShowMe is building a global learning community – a place where anyone can learn or teach anything. The mission of this company is to connect great educators and experts with the students across the world. With rising number of tablet devices and iPads at schools across the world, ShowMe is steadily expanding its user base, already reaching more than 20 million teachers and students.

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Introducing: ShowMe Slides!

ShowMe, much like education, is all about community. The educators who use our software on a daily basis provide valuable feedback for how we can continue to improve the ShowMe platform, ensuring a positive, meaningful experience. One of the most frequent questions we received was about the ability to print your ShowMes, making them easy to distribute to students for use when not on a device.

 

Flipping your Classroom with the Dynamic Duo: Showbie & ShowMe

Take a moment and think back to when you were in school. Picture your teacher standing at the front of the room teaching you a concept up on the board. You’re following along, maybe taking a note or two, and then your mind starts to drift. You start thinking about the soccer game you had the night before, or something that a friend said. You zone back in and realize that you’ve missed a chunk of the lesson.